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NORWICH, Conn. — For more than a decade, Major League Baseball claimed it was waging a war against performance-enhancing drugs. Late last month it made a significant move to clean up the sport.

Baseball will begin blood testing non-40-man roster players in the minors for HGH, or human growth hormone. Major League Baseball does not need players’ consent to implement this random testing, because players in the minor leagues are not members of the Major League Baseball Players Association.

When the time comes for the union and MLB to negotiate a new collective bargaining agreement, blood testing is expected to be a contentious sticking point on both sides. But closer to home, those who are immediately affected — the Connecticut Tigers — support the testing.

“I don’t mind it, I think it’s a long time coming,” shortstop Ryan Soares said, adding there’s a sense of pride in being clean. “I think it’s a big step in the process of trying to clean the game up.”

The Tigers players who spoke on the topic said they have yet to be tested.

Players who test positive will receive a 50-game suspension, the same punishment levied for steroid use.

While testing in the minors for HGH is new, there has already been one suspension. Atlanta minor leaguer Jordan Schafer was suspended 50 games in 2008 after it was determined he purchased HGH.

A pitfall in the testing is the use of some nutritional supplements and medications, which give no advantage, leads to positive test results.

To combat this, players are advised to consult with their team trainer, who will let them know if a product is approved or not. On the major league level, there is a telephone hotline — in English and Spanish — players can use to make sure their purchases are in compliance.

The Detroit Tigers require their players to speak with the individual’s team trainer, strength and condition coach or the minor league strength coach in Lakeland, Fla., to gain approval. The latter makes the rounds, visiting affiliates to keep them abreast of policies regarding supplements, so that it’s never out of mind.

“That’s too bad,” Connecticut manager Howard Bushong said of the sometimes tricky supplement situation. “That’s why our whole organization has to be careful about them, the products that they purchase at a gym or a health food store. It may seem harmless — and it may be harmless. But if it’s against baseball’s rules, well then that’s the thing (that gets people into trouble).”

Not everyone is pleased with the testing. Don Catlin, a scientist who developed a urine test to detect HGH, said MLB’s method is flawed.

“The fact that it’s been around a few thousand tests and only one positive suggests either that there’s much less growth hormone being used than thought, which is doubtful, or the period of detectability is pretty short — a few hours,” Caitlin told The Associated Press. “It’s probably the latter.”

Other critics claim blood testing, because it can reveal more than the test’s intended purpose, is an invasion of privacy.

Even though the players association is reluctant to agree to testing because it doesn’t believe there is reliable, accurate testing, several players have come out in support of blood testing.

The likes of the Yankees’ Lance Berkman and Derek Jeter, as well as the Phillies’ Roy Oswalt, believe blood testing is a step in the right direction.

Their argument is if there isn’t anything to hide, why fight testing. The goal, after all, is to clean up the game.

It’s a sentiment echoed at Dodd Stadium.

“It’s good for me,” said Josh Ashenbrenner. “It’s good for the people who don’t use, because it gives us more of a chance (to succeed).”

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